Family Planning

Family planning programme is the first national programme launched in 1952 for reducing birth rate To stabilize the population at a level consistent with the requirement of national economy.

Family planning provides a choice & freedom to Women for deciding their Family size Number of children and determine the spacing of pregnancies. A woman’s freedom to choose “When to become pregnant” has a direct impact on her health and well-being as well as the neonate.

Key facts
  • 214 million women of reproductive age in developing countries who want to avoid pregnancy are not using a modern contraceptive method.
  • Some family planning methods, such as condoms, help prevent the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.
  • Family planning / contraception reduces the need for abortion, especially unsafe abortion.
  • Family planning reinforces people’s rights to determine the number and spacing of their children.
  • By preventing unintended pregnancy, family planning /contraception prevents deaths of mothers and children.

Family planning allows people to attain their desired number of children and determine the spacing of pregnancies. It is achieved through use of contraceptive methods and the treatment of infertility (this fact sheet focuses on contraception).

Methods of Contraception:

There are different methods of contraception, including:

  • long-acting reversible contraception, such as the implant or intra uterine device (IUD)
  • hormonal contraception, such the pill or the Depo Provera injection
  • barrier methods, such as condoms
  • emergency contraception
  • fertility awareness
  • permanent contraception, such as vasectomy and tubal ligation.
Preventing pregnancy-related health risks in women

A woman’s ability to choose if and when to become pregnant has a direct impact on her health and well-being. Family planning allows spacing of pregnancies and can delay pregnancies in young women at increased risk of health problems and death from early childbearing. It prevents unintended pregnancies, including those of older women who face increased risks related to pregnancy. Family planning enables women who wish to limit the size of their families to do so. Evidence suggests that women who have more than 4 children are at increased risk of maternal mortality.

By reducing rates of unintended pregnancies, family planning also reduces the need for unsafe abortion.

Reducing infant mortality

Family planning can prevent closely spaced and ill-timed pregnancies and births, which contribute to some of the world’s highest infant mortality rates. Infants of mothers who die as a result of giving birth also have a greater risk of death and poor health.

Helping to prevent HIV/AIDS

Family planning reduces the risk of unintended pregnancies among women living with HIV, resulting in fewer infected babies and orphans. In addition, male and female condoms provide dual protection against unintended pregnancies and against STIs including HIV.

Empowering people and enhancing education

Family planning enables people to make informed choices about their sexual and reproductive health. Family planning represents an opportunity for women to pursue additional education and participate in public life, including paid employment in non-family organizations. Additionally, having smaller families allows parents to invest more in each child. Children with fewer siblings tend to stay in school longer than those with many siblings.